Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora (ASWAD)

Second Bi-Annual Conference

AFFIRMATIONS AND CONTESTATIONS: INTERROGATING THE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN AFRICA AND THE AFRICAN DIASPORA

October 2-4, 2003

Northwestern University
Evanston Illinois

 

Sponsors: Program of African Studies, Northwestern University Smith College
GENERAL SCHEDULE
Thursday, Oct. 2nd
1:00-1:15pm: Welcome from Dr. Henry Bienen, President, Northwestern University
1:15-3:00pm: Concurrent Sessions
3:15-5:00pm: Concurrent Sessions
5:00-6:30pm: Dinner
6:30-7:00pm: Presentation
7:00-8:45pm: Roundtable
9:00-10:30pm: Cultural Presentation
 
Friday, Oct. 3rd
8:00-8:45am: ASWAD Executive Board Meeting
9:00-10:45am: Concurrent Sessions
11:00-12:45pm: Concurrent Sessions
12:45-2:00pm Lunch
2:00-3:45pm: Concurrent Sessions
4:00-5:45pm: Concurrent Sessions
6:00-7:00pm: Keynote Address
7:00-8:30pm: Reception
 
Saturday, Oct. 4th
 
8:00-:8:45am: ASWAD General Meeting
9:00-10:45am: Concurrent Sessions
11:00-12:45pm: Concurrent Sessions
12:45-2:30pm: Lunch
2:30-4:30pm: Concluding Plenary
 
PROGRAM SCHEDULE
All rooms, with the exception of the Omni Hotel and the venue for Thursday night’s cultural performance (9:00pm), are in the Norris University Center.Books by participants are available in a special display at Northwestern University Bookstore in the lower level of Norris University Center.

 

Thursday, Oct. 2nd

1:00-1:15pm

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Welcome: Dr. Henry Bienen, President, Northwestern University
Introduction by Richard Joseph, Director of the Program of African Studies
Location: Michigan Room
 

Thursday, Oct. 2nd

1:15-3:00pm

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Session 1: Death and Healing: African Cultural Practice in the Caribbean and North America
Papers: “The Nganga and the Mama Minje Dance: The Evolution of Afro-Creole Religion in Nineteenth Century Berbice (Guyana) Slave Society” Gordon Gill, History, Howard University, Washington, D.C.
Nkisi in the House of the Puritan: Jenny Cole in Deerfield, Massachusetts” Lillian Ashcraft-Eason, History, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green “Herbal Baths: Afro-therapeutic Transmissions? An Exploration of the Cleansing-Purity Concept in Jamaican Bath Therapy” Claudette Anderson, Liberal Arts, Emory University, Atlanta
Chair: Lillian Ashcraft-Eason, History, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green
Location: Purdue Room
 
Session 2: Culture, Identity, and Polity in Africa and the Diaspora
Papers: “Afro-Cuban Religion and Discourses of Collective Identity” Christine Ayorinde, Project Coordinator, If‡-Yoruba Contemporary Arts Trust, London “Rethinking Concepts of ‘Ethnicity’, ‘Nation’, and ‘Tribe’ through an Examination of African-Derived Ritual Lineages in the Americas” Ivor L. Miller, Center for Black Diaspora, DePaul University, Chicago

“Lugha Ya Taifa: Kiswahili, Pan-Africanism and Nationalism in Tanzania and the United States” Lessie Tate, History, Texas Southern University, Houston

“Reforming Senegal’s Clientelist Democracies: The Role of the Diaspora,” Linda J. Beck, Political Science, Barnard College, Columbia University, New York

“Raisin’ in the Sun? Critical Reflections on the Drama of African Diaspora and Association Football” Chanzo Osei Greenidge, Centre for Latin America and the Caribbean, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine

Chair:  Barbara Krauthamer, History, New York University
Location: Michigan Room
 
Session 3: Labor, Land, and the Law in Africa and the Diaspora
Papers: “The Structure of the African American Labour Market in the U.S. Economy: From Slavery to the Present” Anthony Paul Andrews, Liberal Studies Governors State University, University Park, IL”Conflict and Land Reform: Empowering Rural Black Communities in Brazil and Mozambique” Merle L. Bowen, Political Science, University of Illinois, Urbana

“African Diaspora and Private Enterprise Development in Africa” Emmanuel Nnadozie, Economics, Truman State University, Kirksville, MO

“Africa and recompense: Historical Justification to Africans in the Motherland and Diaspora” Yomi Akinyeye, History, University of Lagos, Akoka, Yaba

Chair: Merle L. Bowen, Political Science, University of Illinois, Urbana
Location: Indiana Room
   

Thursday, Oct. 2nd

3:15-5:00pm

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Session 4: Pan-Africanism, Migrations, and Black Female Radicalism in the Early Twentieth Century
Papers: “‘Sea Kaffirs’: The Political, Socio-Economic and Fraternal Activities of West Indian and African American Garveyites in 1920s Cape Town” Robert Trent Vinson, History, Washington University, St. Louis”The Sojourners for Truth and Justice: A Black Radical Feminist Organization during the early 1950s” Erik S. McDuffie, History, New York University

“I.T.A. Wallace-Johnson in Nigeria: A Reappraisal of His Pan-African and International Links, 1930-1932” LaRay Denzer, African Studies, Northwestern University, Evanston

“Uplifting the Race: Black Power, Race Leadership, and Pan-African Reconstruction in Casely Hayford’s Ethiopia Unbound” Kwaku Larbi Korang, English and African Studies, University of Illinois, Urbana

“The Deportation of Phyllis Edmeade” Lorna Biddle Rinear, History, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

Chair: Robert Trent Vinson, History, Washington University, St. Louis
Location: Purdue Room
 
Session 5: The Local, National and Transnational Context of Identity: ‘Race’ and Nation in Nineteenth Century Peru and Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Cuba
Papers: “Alienation, Assimilation, and the Politics of Black British Identity: Anglophone Antilleans and West African Creoles in Spanish Colonial Cuba, 1822-1856” Joseph Dorsey, History, Purdue University, West Lafayette”Birthing the Nation in Black-White and Color: AfroCuban Perspectives on ‘Race’ and Nationhood in Nineteenth Century Cuba” Fannie Theresa Rushing, History, Benedictine University, Lisle, IL

“Beyond Race and nation Historiography: Writing Trasnational History and Race in Cuba and the United States” Frank Guridy, Africana Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa

“Militarism, Manipulation and the Menace of Manumission in Independent Peru (1821-1855)” Harcourt Fuller, History, City College of New York

Chair: Fannie Theresa Rushing, History, Benedictine University, Lisle, IL
Location: Indiana Room
 
Session 6: Hip Hop, Race, and Rites in the Diaspora
Papers: “Hip Hop and the Territorialization of Democracy, Citizenship and Blackness in Brazil” Julio César de Souza Tavares, Communication, Federal Fluminense University, Brazil”‘Black Men, We’ve Been Suffering for Too Long’, Rap Music in France and the Race Question: Challenging the Republican Model” Maboula Soumahoro, History, Université Franois Rabelais, Tours

“Young Gifted Black Hope: Notes on Africana Youth and the Hip Hop Generation’s March toward Zion” Veronica Njeri-Imani, Literature, Arizona State University, Tempe

“Rites of Passage for African American Girls in the United States” Joyce F. Kirk, Africology, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Chair: Julio César de Souza Tavares, Communication, Federal Fluminense University
Location: Michigan Room

Thursday, Oct. 2nd

5:00-6:30pm

Dinner

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Thursday, Oct. 2nd

6:30-7:00pm

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Presentation: “The Diaspora and Africa’s Distress: A Research and Action Agenda” Richard Joseph, Director of the Program of African Studies
Location: Northwestern Room
 

Thursday, Oct. 2nd

7:00-8:45pm

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Roundtable: Africa and the Diaspora: Current State of the Scholarship
Panelists: Abena Busia, Literature, Rutgers University, New BrunswickMicere Githae Mugo, Literature and African American Studies, Syracuse University

Verene Shepherd, History, University of the West Indies, Mona

Rosalyn Terborg-Penn, History, Morgan State University, Baltimore

Julio César de Souza Tavares, Communication, Federal Fluminense University, Brazil

Moderator: Michael Gomez, History, New York University
Location: Northwestern Room
 

Thursday, Oct. 2nd

9:00-10:30pm

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Cultural Presentation: Bag Ladies: Carrying a Diaspora Colored Black, Thick Routes Performance Collage
Location: Theatre and Interpretation Center (TIC), Struble Theatre

Friday, Oct 3rd

8:00-8:45am

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  ASWAD Executive Board Meeting
Location: Program of African Studies, 620 Library Place
 

Friday, Oct 3rd

9:00-10:45am

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Session 7: Transnational Imaginings and Encounters: Youth Movements and Diaspora as Tourism
Papers: “On Memory: Erasures and Instantiations” Paulla A. Ebron, Anthropology, Stanford University, Palo Alto”Landscapes of Memory: Representing the African Diaspora’s Return ‘Home'” Sandra L. Richards, African American Studies and Theatre, Northwestern University, Evanston

“Encountering the Diaspora: Memory, Slavery, and Tourism in Ghana” Bayo Holsey, African American Studies, Northwestern University, Evanston

“Africa in Florida: Shifting Realities and Hyper-Realities in Diaspora Studies” Amanda Carlson, Art History and African Studies, University of Hartford, West Hartford

Chair: Sandra L. Richards, African American Studies and Theatre, Northwestern
Location: Northwestern Room A
 
Session 8: Revolt in the Caribbean and the Haitian Revolution: Images and Politics in the Diaspora
Papers: “Revolutionary Legacies: Haiti and the Aftermath of the 1791 Revolt in Virginia, Louisiana, and South Carolina” Walter Rucker, History and Ethnic Studies, University of Nebraska, Lincoln”To Leave the House of Bondage: The Influence of the Haitian Revolution on African American Emigration” Leslie M. Alexander, History, Ohio State University, Columbus

“Race, Class, Resistance, and the Aftermath of Emancipation in Antigua, 1834-1918” Natasha Lightfoot, History, New York University

“On the Frontlines: The Unsung Rebels and the Emancipation War of 1832” Tanya Huelett, History, New York University

Chair: David Barry Gaspar, History, Duke University
Location: Northwestern Room B
 
Session 9: African Meditations: Narratives and Folklore in the Diaspora
Papers: “Frederick Douglass and William Wells Brown: Thoughts on Slave Culture, 1845- 1893” Jermaine Archer, History, University of California, Riverside”Riding the Air: Flight and Transmigration in the Plantation Societies of the American South and the Caribbean” Jason Young, History, SUNY-Buffalo

“Baquaqua and Hannah Crafts: Recent Texts Documenting Enslavement and Liberation” Joseph McLaren, English, Hofstra University, Hempstead

“Anthony Benezet’s Vision of Africa in the Struggle against Slavery and the Slave Trade” Maurice Jackson, History, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.

Chair: Jason Young, History, SUNY-Buffalo
Location: Indiana Room
 
Session 10: Diaspora in Media and Visual Art
Papers: “The Glamorous of Misery and the Representation of Blacks in the Brazilian Media” Julio César de Souza Tavares, Communication, Federal Fluminense University, Brazil”Mapping Out a Caribbean Cinematic Identity” Sophie Saint-Just, French and Film, City University of New York

“Memory and Oblivion” Marianetta Porter, Art and Design, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

“Letters fro Africa: Freed Brazilian Slaves Who Returned to Africa in the Nineteenth Century” Carlos da Fonseca, Diplomat and Historian, Brazilian Embassy, Washington, D.C.

Chair: Eileen Julien, French, Comparative Literature, and David C. Driskell Center, University of Maryland, College Park
Location: Michigan Room
 

Friday, Oct 3rd

11:00-12:45pm

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Session 11: Contested and Shared Perspectives on the Struggle for Racial Reparations in Africa, the Caribbean Region and the United States
Papers: “Reparations for People of African Descent: A Global Perspective” William Darity, Economics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill”African American College Student Perceptions on Reparations and the African Diaspora” Bruce H. Wade, Sociology, Spelman College, Atlanta

“Beelzebub on Reparations: Contestations and Refutations” A.E. Afigbo, History, Okigwe, Imo State, Nigeria

“Reparations: Acknowledging Our Humanity” Elizabeth Nunez, English, CUNY Medgar Evans College, New York City

Chair: Bruce H. Wade, Sociology, Spelman College, Atlanta
Location: Michigan Room
 
Session 12: Music in the Diaspora; Politics and Connections
Papers: “‘All Africa’: The Aural Making and Unmaking of the Third World, 1954-1965” Njoroge Njoroge, American Studies, New York University”Motherland, Rebellion and Revolution: Africa and the Arts of the Black Power Movement” Kheli R. Willetts, African American Studies, Syracuse University

“Roots and Culture: The Music of Rebellion” Asomgyee W. Pamoja, Social and Behavioral Science, Capital Community College, Hartford

“Syncopated Rhythms: Jazz and Caribbean Culture” Herbie Miller, Draper School of Interdisciplinary Studies, New York University

Chair: Jerry Ward, English, Dillard University, New Orleans
Location: Northwestern Room A
 
Session 13 Complicating Identity in Africa and the Diaspora
Papers: “Census and Sensibility: Negotiating Migrations from the Colony (Sénégal) to the Métropole (France), 1831-1960” Nancy Kwang Johnson, Comparative Politics and the African Diaspora, University of Windsor, Ontario”Transnational Displacements and Cultural Continuity: A Case Study of Francophone Afro-Vietnamese Communities in Senegal and the Ivory Coast” Ibrahima Wade, Romance Languages, Colorado College, Colorado Springs

“Africa and Its Others: Plural Legacies in the Caribbean Diaspora” H. Adlai Murdoch, French and Francophone Studies, University of Illinois, Urbana

“Diaspora Begins at Home: (Dis)placing ‘Kétu’ in an Atlantic World” Lorelle Denise Semley, History, Wesleyan University, Middletown

Chair: Nancy Kwang Johnson, Comparative Politics and the African Diaspora, University of Windsor, Ontario
Location: Northwestern Room B
 
Session 14: Documentary and Discussion
Video: Scattered Africa: Faces and Voices of the African Diaspora
Presenter: Sheila Walker, Anthropology, University of Texas at Austin and Spelman College
Location: Indiana Room
 

Friday, Oct 3rd

12:45-2:00pm

Lunch
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Friday, Oct 3rd

2:00-3:45pm

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Session 15: Transnational Circumlocutions: The Sacred and The Profane
Papers: “Diaspora and Drug Trafficking in Africa: A Case Study of Ghana” Emmanuel Akyeampong, History, Harvard University, Cambridge”Recasting ‘Black Venus’ in the African Diaspora of the Global Age” Jayne O. Ifekwunigwe, Anthropology, University of East London

“Congolese Diaspora in the Netherlands” Mindanda Mohogu Motingia, African Studies, University of Leiden

“Leaving Babylon to Come Home to Israel: Closing the Circle of the Black Diaspora” Fran Markowitz

Chair: Ralph Austen, History, University of Chicago
Location: Michigan Room
 
Session 16: Unmasking the Silences of Intra-Diasporic Identity and Relations
Papers: “‘Strong’ Women = ‘Strong’ Communities and Nations: Psychosocial Stressors and Diasporic Women Carrying/Caring for Children and Men” Mona Taylor Phillips, Sociology, Spelman College, Atlanta”Understanding Ifa as the Indigenized Faith Systems of Africa: The Dualities and Multiplicities of Religious Identity in the Diaspora” Georgene Bess Montgomery, English, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta

“Same ship; different trip: Interrogating the ‘All o’ we is one’ paradigm of Diaspora in the classroom” Kathleen E. Phillips Lewis, History, Spelman College, Atlanta

“Closing Ranks: Anticolonialism, McCarthyism and the NAACP” William Jelani Cobb, History, Spelman College, Atlanta

Chair: Mona Taylor Phillips, Sociology, Spelman College, Atlanta
Location: Northwestern Room A
 
Session 17: Connections in the Literature and Language of Africa and the Diaspora
Papers: “Ritualized Insults and the African Diaspora: ‘Sounding’ in African American Vernacular English and ‘Wording’ in Nigerian Pidgin” Nicholas Faraclas, Lourdes Gonzalez, Migdalia Medina, Wendell Villanueva Reyes, Linguistics, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras”Frantz Fanon and Derek Walcott: Common Concerns on Colonialism” Tatiana Tagirova, English, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras

“‘Telling Our Story in Our Own Words’: Lost Meanings, Prejudiced Interpretations, and Identity Distortion in Toni Morrison’s Beloved and Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart” Hope Eghagha, English, University of Lagos, Akoka-Lagos

“Dennis Scott’s An Echo in the Bone and the Pedagogical Agenda of the Democratic State” Kanika Batra, Department of English, Loyola University Chicago“The Image of the Black Soul: From the Hut Near the Congo to the Banks of the Mississippi” Muyiwa Falaiye, Philosophy, University of Lagos, Akoka-Lagos

Chair: Nicholas Faraclas, Linguistics, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras
Location: Indiana Room
 
Session 18: The African Diaspora in the Lands of Islam
Papers: “Popular Arab Views of Africans: Medieval and Modern “ Saadi Simawe, English and Africana Studies, Grinnell College, Iowa”The Sorrows of Bakhita: Tracking the Life of a Slave through Her Worshippers” Eve Troutt Powell, History, University of Georgia, Athens

“Trans-Saharan Cultures, The Case of the Tikna of Western Africa” Ghislaine Lydon, History, UCLA

“Slavery in the Colony of Algeria during the July Monarchy: 1830-1848” Yacine Daddi Addoun, History, York University, Toronto

Chair: John O. Hunwick, History and Religion, Northwestern University, Evanston
Location: Northwestern Room B
 

Friday, Oct 3rd

4:00-5:45pm

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Session 19: Contemporary Issues in African Diaspora Aesthetics
Papers: “Deconstructing Ghanaian Architectural Body Poses” Nia Love, Dance, Smith College, Northampton”The Moving Poetics of the Sweet and Sour: A Phenomenology of African Diasporic Fusion Aesthetics” Augusto Soledade, Dance, Smith College, Northampton

“Corporeal Necessities in the Dancing Divinities” Yvonne Daniel, Dance and Afro-American Studies, Smith College, Northampton

“The Diaspora-as-Object in Contemporary African Art” John Peffer, Art History, Smith College, Northampton

Chair: Yvonne Daniel, Dance and Afro-America Studies, Smith College, Northampton
Location: Northwestern Room A
 
Session 20: Conceptualizing the Diaspora
Papers: “Theorizing African Diaspora Studies: The Political, The Cultural” Tejmola Olaniyan, English and African Languages and Literature, University of Wisconsin, Madison”The African Diaspora in African American History prior to Reconstruction” Alex Bontemps, African American Studies, Arizona State University, Tempe

“Mediated Lives: Memory and the Construction of History in the Caribbean” Joseph K. Adjaye, Africana Studies, University of Pittsburgh

“The First World War and the Construction of African American Diasporic Consciousness” Chad L. Williams, History, Princeton University

“African Diaspora Connections: Expressions of the US and the UK” Mark Christian, Black World Studies and Sociology, Miami University, Hamilton, OH

Chair: David Schoenbrun, History, Northwestern University
Location: Michigan Room
 
Session 21: Narrating Color, Demarcating the Nation: Gendered Racial Identities in the Twentieth Century Spanish Caribbean
Papers: “Race, Culture, and Identity Politics: The Many Texts of negrismo” Jerome Branche, Latin American Literature and Cultural Studies, University of Pittsburgh”Beyond the Tragic Mulatto: Blackness, Race-Mixing, and Social Agency in Early Puerto Rican National Identity Discourse” Magali Roy-Féquire, Gender and Women’s Studies, Knox College, IL

“Gender and Race in the Dialogue on the National Question in Puerto Rico during the 1930s” Gladys M. Jiménez-Mu–oz, Education and Human Development, Binghamton University

“Color Lines in Castro’s Cuba” Frederick L. Hord, Black Studies, Knox College, IL

Discussant: Kelvin A. Santiago-Valles, Sociology, Latin American and Caribbean Area Studies, Africana Studies SUNY-Binghamton
Chair: Gladys M. Jiménez-Mu–oz, Education and Human Development, Binghamton University
Location: Northwestern Room B
 

Friday, Oct 3rd

6:00-7:00pm

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Keynote Address: “Oppression and Creativity in the Diaspora: Tensions and Resonances in Scholarship” Sterling Stuckey, History, University of California- RiversideIntroduction by Robert Hill, History, UCLA
Location: Northwestern Room
 

Friday, Oct 3rd

7:00-8:30pm

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  Reception
Location: Ballroom, Omni Orrington Hotel
 

Saturday, Oct. 4th

8:00-8:45am

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  ASWAD General Business Meeting
Location: Michigan Room, Norris Center
   

Saturday, Oct. 4th

9:00-10:45am

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Session 22: Of Bonds and (Ex)Bonds’men’: Rethinking Links between Afro-Diasporic Resistances in Historical Perspective
Papers: “From Negro de Naci—n to Negro: Heterogeneity, Homogeneity, and Slave Resistance – A Case Study from Puerto Rico” Joseph Dorsey, History, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN”World-Historical Ties among ‘Spontaneous’ Slave Resistances in the Americas” Kelvin Santiago-Valles, Sociology, Latin American and Caribbean Area Studies, Africana Studies, SUNY-Binghamton

“‘Let Us Guide Our Own Destiny’: Re-thinking the History of the Black Star Line” Jeffrey Howison, Sociology, SUNY-Binghamton

“Afro-Atlantic Communications and Educational Institutions of Resistance” William Fred Santiago-Valles Africana Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo

Discussant: William G. Martin, Sociology, SUNY-Binghamton
Chair: Michael O. West, Sociology and African Studies, SUNY-Binghamton
Location: Northwestern Room A
 
Session 23: Migration/Repatriation to Liberia and Nigeria
Papers: “One Africa, Two Visions – Memory and Place, 1914-1940” Ibrahim Sundiata, History, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA”‘It is a New Country’: Impressions of Liberia in the Letters of North Carolina Emigrants” Claude Clegg, History, Indiana University, Bloomington

“Black Families, Transnational Immigration, and Conflict: The Resettlement of Black Virginia Families in Monrovia prior to the Formation of the Liberian Republic, 1817-1847” John Wess Grant, History, Michigan State University, East Lansing

“Slavery, Migration, and Anticolonialism: One Family’s History of the African Diaspora” Lisa A. Lindsay, History, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Chair: Ibrahim Sundiata, History, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA
Location: Northwestern Room B
 
Session 24: Questions and Meanings in Africa and the Americas. Part One: Africa
Panel Co-Sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities
Papers: Papers: “Maki – ‘the one who refuses’: Meanings of Words in the Search for Intentionality in the Construction of Slavery in West Africa” Joko Sengova, Child and Family Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa”Flying Africans and Other Sorcerers: Narratives of Flight as Occult Power in Africa and the Americas” John Cinnamon, Anthropology, Miami University, Hamilton, OH

“The Bantu Origins of the Flying Africans” S. Ekema Agbaw, English, Bloomsburg University, PA

Discussants: Olivia Smith Storey, Humanities, Colby-Sawyer College, New London, NH
James Bryant, Sociology and Anthropology, College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA
Chair: Mary Ann Mahony, History, Central Connecticut State University, New Britain, CT
Location: Michigan Room
 

Saturday, Oct. 4th

11:00-12:45pm

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Session 25: Concretizing the Connections: Visions of Political Engagement
Papers: “Towards African Citizenship” Carole Boyce Davies and Babacar M’bow, African-New World Studies, Florida International University, Miami “The Diaspora in the Americas, the African Union, and NEPAD (New Partnership for African Development): Difficult Questions and Harder Answers” Yvonne Captain, Romance Languages, George Washington University, Washington, D.C.

“African Americans and Conflict Resolution in Africa: New Road Map for a New Century” Philip C. Aka, Political Science, Chicago State University

Chair: Colin Palmer, History, Princeton University
Location: Michigan Room
Session 26: Re: Membering – Nuancing African Diasporan Gendered Identity
Papers: “Defiant Mothers, Obsequious Fathers: Gendered Observations of Nineteenth Century Afro-Caribbean Rituals” Edwina Ashie-Nikoi, History, New York University”From Goobers to Gumbo: Gender and Identity through Food in the Diaspora” Gloria Harper Dickinson, African American Studies, College of New Jersey, Ewing

“Gender, Transmigration and Faith Systems: Analyzing Merle Collins’ Angel through the Lens of the Ifa Paradigm” Georgene Bess Montgomery, English, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta

“On Becoming a Black Woman: TransNational Space and Identity in Michelle Cliff’s No Telephone to Heaven” Shirley Toland-Dix, English, Spelman College, Atlanta

“Daughters of Tituba: Black Feminist Traditions and Diasporic Identity” Kathleen Phillips Lewis, History, Spelman College, Atlanta

Discussant/
Chair:
Kathleen Phillips Lewis, History, Spelman College, Atlanta
Location: Northwestern Room A
 
Session 27: Questions and Meanings in Africa and the Americas. Part Two: The Americas
Panel Co-Sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities
Papers: “Those Who Remain: The Country-Born in the Trope of the Flying African” Olivia Smith Storey, Humanities, Colby-Sawyer College, New London, NH”Blood Rituals in Cartagena de Indias (1634): Creoles, Angolans, Malenbas and Queen Leonor of the Palenque de Lim—n” Kathryn Joy McKnight, Spanish and Portuguese, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque

“Gender and Religion, Ritual and Community in the Quarters: The Chesapeake, 1760-1830” James Bryant, Sociology and Anthropology, College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA

“Taking the Fall: Solidarity, Negotiation, and Manipulation among the Enslaved of Nineteenth-Century Brazil” Mary Ann Mahony, History, Central Connecticut State University, New Britain, CT

Discussants: S. Ekema Agbaw, English, Bloomsburg University, PA
John Cinnamon, Anthropology, Miami University, Hamilton, OH
Chair: Joko Sengova, Child and Family Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa
Location: Northwestern Room B
 

Saturday, Oct. 4th

12:45-2:30pm

Lunch

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Saturday, Oct. 4th

2:30-4:30pm

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Concluding Plenary: Analyses and CommentaryBoubacar Barry, History, Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar

Carole Boyce Davies, African-New World Studies, Florida International University, Miami

Michael Hanchard, Political Science, Northwestern University

Robert Hill, History, UCLA

Abiola Irele, African and African American Studies, Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University, Cambridge

Moderator: Yvonne Daniel, Dance and Afro-American Studies, Smith College, Northampton
Location: Northwestern Room
 
Registration and AccommodationsThe registration fee for faculty is $50 and $15 for students. Checks should be made out to “The Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora,” or simply “ASWAD,” and should be mailed to the following address:

Michael Gomez
Department of History
New York University
53 Washington Square South, 7th Flr.
New York, NY 10012-1098

Office: 212-998-8624
Fax: 212-995-4017
michael.gomez@nyu.edu

ASWAD’s website: www.aswadiaspora.org

Accommodations for the conference are provided at the Omni Orrington Hotel, adjacent to Northwestern’s campus, and the Hampton Inn (Skokie), about 10 minutes away from the university (free shuttle service to and from campus will be available). You have until September 18, 2003 to make your reservations at the Omni, and until September 3, 2003 at the Hampton, after which the rooms will be released.

Please make your reservations directly with the hotels:

Omni Orrington Hotel
1710 Orrington Ave.
Evanston, IL 60201

1-800-THE-OMNI, or 1-847-866-8700

Online reservations can be made through the following address: orrrez@omniorrington.com

The preferred group rate is $109 per room, per night, single or double occupancy, for October 2 and 3. You can possibly negotiate a similar rate should you wish to arrive earlier or depart later. The conference will officially end late Saturday afternoon.

For the Omni, you will need to state your affiliation with the Northwestern University African Studies Program to receive the preferred group rate.

Hampton Inn
5201 Old Orchard Rd.
Skokie, IL 60077

1-800-426-7866, or 1-847-583-1111

Reservations can also be made through their website: www.hamptonsuitesskokie.com

The preferred group rate is $99 per room, per night, single or double occupancy, for October 2 and 3. Continental breakfast is included. A similar rate may be negotiable for earlier arrivals/later departures.

For the Hampton, use the group code “SAD” or the name ASWAD to receive the preferred group rate.

Additional hotels in the Evanston area (with whom we do not have an arrangement):

Best Western University Plaza: 1-800-EVANSTON, or 1-847-491-6400
Hilton Garden Inn: 1-800-774-1500, or1-847-475-6400
The Doubletree (Skokie):